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The Oslo Cardigan pattern from Seamwork was the first I bought and even though I didn’t blog about it I made five versions of it: one is this longer version with shorter sleeves, another is a micro-fleece house robe, a third, another longer cardigan made of suede (it was not stretchy so it turned out one size smaller), a fourth, a short wool cardigan that was too itchy to wear and a fifth garment, a kimono style wool cardigan with knitted sleeves and a belt. The version here was the first one I made. One of the mistakes I made…

I actually made this crochet tank top last year, but I didn’t get the change to post about it. I was also very excited about the project in the beginning, but the fit was… meh. I first sewed a lined crop top in a green rayon. I bought this fabric with plans of making a beautiful evening dress for a wedding last year, but after many hours of frustration I ended up with no dress and lot of small pieces of fabric. This is what happens when you don’t plan sufficiently and just cut by eye. Alas, a year has…

Linen is wonderful. Like cotton, linen, a textile woven from flax fibres, is one of the oldest and most popular textiles in history. It comes in different kind of weaves, looser or tighter, unbleached or dyed, and when washed, it wrinkles very easily. There’s an old proverb that says “Never choose your women or your linen by candlelight” (Oxford Dictionary of proverbs) Apparently, it warns agains the deceitfulness of things in the light of the candle. Thankfully we don’t live in the sixteenth century, but sexist remark aside, it does talk about the importance given to choosing the best linen. This particular linen…

Summer. You pour a glass of cold water and the surface of the glass instantly turns opaque, then melts into thin, transparent paths. You wait for, and enjoy even the mildest breeze in the hot air. Summers are for keeping what your wear airy and fluid and your hair up and away from your face. They’re also a good time to start simple and useful projects, like a turban-style headband. It’s easy to make one. All you need is scrap fabric and a piece of elastic. I started by creating two wedge shaped tubes of fabric, that I stitched on…

Not too long ago I decided that I would stop buying yarn. My yarn stash was growing bugger and bigger and the number of finished and loved projects was still very small. Some of the knitted projects I have finished lately are: a white cardigan (my first knitted garment!) which turned out cute this vest which is in the unravel pile right now this mint knitted t-shirt which turned out meh and was since donated this cute pom pom hat I wore all winter + 3 other hats I made as gifts (so rewarding <3) and this wool chunky sweater, which I really liked…

I made a skirt! And I actually wore it outside the house, moments which are important in my life as a maker and wearer or skirts 😉 I was never a big fan or skirts because I considered them fussy and higher maintenance than a pair of shorts, especially when you bike, run around and sit in the grass, looking at ducks floating peacefully on the lake. But when I received this beautiful fabric as a Christmas gift, I thought it would make a really pretty skirt. I didn’t know if I would really wear it, but I made a promise…

This is actually a short sleeve top I made almost two years ago (!), I just drafted the pattern using a t-shirt I already owned and, instead of cutting the body of the top at the sleeve point, I continued the shoulder line, perpendicular to the neck line. I explained how to create the flare, in the How to make a flared waist tank top blogpost. The construction is very simple: I first sewed the shoulders seams together, then the side seams. I then finished the flutter sleeves, the neckline and the bottom hem. Very simple and very practical. Garment notes: Sewing pattern: self-made.…

If you’ve been reading my blog before, you might have noticed a lot of Mesa Love. Mesa is a basic, yet beautifully shaped, t-shirt dress pattern from from Seamwork Magazine. I love Seamwork Magazine. I love the simpler lines and how easy it is to modify them. It’s easy to be creative with a good base. Other Mesa-based garments I made: Magenta knit mesa dress (no alterations) Green textured knit mesa (modified) For this long sleeve tunic I changed the neckline a bit by bringing in closer to the neck (to make it less boat-neck-shaped) and then lowered it a few…

This is a slouchy T-shirt shaped open cardigan in stockinette stitch. It doesn’t get simpler than this. There’s no ribbing, no shaping, apart from the increase for the sleeves and it’s knitted in a cross shape, from the back piece, to shoulders and sleeves, to the two front pieces. The fabric is lucky soft white acrylic that looks good over my mesa dresses. Being that the -28 C degrees weather doesn’t permit really permit non-warm layering, this will have to wait until spring, probably. I keep thinking whether I should ad a closure of some kind or just leave it as it…

As happy as I was when I first made this wool Oslo cardigan, and as much as I tried to wear it outside the house, the cardigan just didn’t work! It was just so itchy! It was itchy even on top of two layers, so lining it would have not worked. So I washed it cold and dried it hot in the drier to see if the felted wool would be a bit less itchy. The cardigan was oversized so it worked, but alas, it was still itchy. I washed it with conditioner in an attempt to make it even…