Posts Tagged“indie sewing patterns”

Eleonore Klein’s Wearability Project

pretty clothes on a line

There are a few reasons why I like Eléonore Klein’s Wearability Project: it’s funny, refreshingly sincere, useful and inspiring. It’s also in French, but Google Translate should help you with that unless you want to do a 2 in 1 and learn how to improve your wardrobe and French at the same time.

Eléonore, the mastermind behind Deer and Doe, and the inventor of the popular Plantain Top sewing pattern, has decided to review and edit her wardrobe, specifically the garments she sews for herself and to identify the outfits she best feels in – and basically – to sew more of those. For me this makes a lot of sense, as one of my sewing resolutions for 2014 is to sew less and better.

She documents her whole process, from dying garments she is not wearing, to identifying bad cuts and bad styles for her and also talks about accessories she loves but don’t fit with her day to day style. That is maybe what I like best about this project: how much she adapts it to her day to day use. She introduces an interesting concept in designing one’s wardrobe, and that is cost per use. What she’s saying, and I can’t agree more is that price (of fabric, accessories used, pattern, time spent making) is a relative thing: a super cheap t-shirt you made in 2 hours and never wore is more expensive than a 50 euros shirt that you wear every week.

I also like that she’s getting those garments  and even fabric that she’s not 100% happy about out of her closet: either selling them or giving away or recycling them. This is something that is also very important for me.

The other day I was having dinner with my friends and they had the idea to organise a garment reconstruction/clothes swap, which sounds like fun. Except, I almost don’t have any clothes to swap; I’ve either given them away when we moved or put into the remake pile and that’s not a very interesting pile for my friends, I am sure. They were also very surprised to hear that the only things I bought since September last year were workout clothes and a leather jacket that was actually a gift.

I’m excited though, I’ll tell you how that goes. Have a lovely Sunday!

 

Great Things in Sewing This Week

Something to sew

Don’t you love a free sewing pattern, especially when the pattern maker is modelling an awesome garment made with it?

I was already impressed by Deer and Doe and their sewing patterns for women and not men men, but this new free t-shirt sewing pattern is really cool. You’d have to sign in to download it, but the pattern looks like it’s worth it.

free tshirt sewing pattern deer and doe

I’ve bought a thick raspberry-pink jersey in my last holiday and this looks like a good project for it.

Something to think about

I really like Laurwyn’s post about body image. I think many of us don’t know how good looking they really are. We are taught and used to thinking females are only beautiful if they look like whatever the era’s models look like. Curvy, slim or supper skinny, tall, but not too tall, shorter than most males, but not too short etc. Instead of looking at ourselves, we look at what’s missing.

It’s refreshing to change the tune for once.

Something to do

wardrobe architect

I like Sarai’s new project, Wardrobe Architect and the exercises she suggests.

Week two’s assignment is creating a collection of images that describe your core style. Sarai takes you on a self-discovery journey of personal style and then helps you pick 5 words that best describe your style. Mine are tomboy, natural, comfortable, feminine, bicycle. Bicycle?? Why is that there? Well, I was struggling to find a fifth word to describe how I dress and since I use my bike everyday, that affects how I dress.

I won’t wear anything polyester for example because I need fabrics that breathe on their own. I won’t wear short skirts or too short shorts because that won’t be comfortable. I won’t wear a jacket that’s too fitted, because it would bother me on the bike. And I don’t like to be bothered 🙂

That’s all from me, for now. How about you? What did you sew? What did you think about? What did you do this week?