Posts Tagged“vintage patterns”

5 Vintage Necklines and Collars Ideas

One of the reasons why I like vintage sewing books is how practical and down to earth they are. Many go over women’s fashion and expect seamstresses to be able to apply the learned concepts to make garments for kids and men.

The purpose of learning dressmaking is to be able to fill the needs and wants of all members of the family, garment making shouldn’t take too much time, yet the clothes should enhance the personality of the wearer and last a long time.

I am curious whether you agree with me or not on this one, but I think that one of the details of a garment where personality and taste are most obvious is the neckline.

It can change a dress or blouse completely.

Maybe you remember one of my posts, in which I was sketching various vintage necklines; today I’m listing a few other vintage necklines ideas.

The sailor bow tie look good both in patterned fabric, like in the image below and in a sparkly white with dark blue piping. This one closes in the back with snaps, but you could move the bow to the back and close the blouse with it.

bow tie vintage neckline

The square neckline is safe and sweet. Keep the straps quite fat like this dress, or slim them down for a more delicate look.

square vintage neckline

If you like the look of a handkerchief worn over a shirt, you’ll like this small collar on a dress. I like the contrast fabric also.

I love this faux wrap neckline and how simple the whole look is. I also like how this blouse in particular fits the model quite loosely.

faux wrap vintage neckline

And last but not least, a sweetheart neckline, this time adorned with a zipper. I quite like the contrast between the sweetness of the neckline shape and the metal of the zipper.

vintage sweetheart neckline

What about you? What’s you favourite vintage or modern neckline?

Images from: 1) sailor bow tie, 2) square neckline, 3) tiny collar, 4) faux wrap neckline, 5) sweetheart neckline.

Ode to Vintage Sewing: Inspiration

Follow sky turtle’s board vintage sewing on Pinterest.

I’m not even sure what makes it so special. Why vintage sewing is so magical and breath-taking.

Maybe it’s the black and white pictures, the perfect hour-glass silhouettes, the feminine lines, or maybe it’s how nicely they fit the women in vintage fashion photography.

Clothes are so affordable now and we’ve become such automated shopping machines, that buying a garment that fits, that’s both durable and well-made is not important anymore.

In September last year I started a clothes shopping fast and five months later I’ve bought: a pair of pants to replace the pair that my mother accidentally burned and fitness gear (a pair of shorts and a t-shirt).

I’ll share more about this soon, but one of the things I’ve realised is how few clothes we really need. I’ve travelled for 3 weeks in December and January, in different climates and I’ve managed with around 12 pieces. I washed t-shirts overnight when I needed to, I mixed and matched and in general I was free to enjoy my holidays and not worry about what I’ll wear (my secret was to take everything I really loved with me:).

One of my resolutions this year is to sew less. To spend more time drawing clothes, thinking about garments I would like to sew and less time sewing. I want to create garments I will love. And wear and wear and wear.

Vintage fashion is one of my new sources of inspiration. Hope you like the Board 🙂

 

 

A Cute Vintage Gathered Yoke Blouse

a-vintage-inspired-gathered-yoke-blouse
This is another idea from ”Precision draping; a simple method for developing designing talent” by Nelle L. Weymouth.

And it seems so easy to make also: just cut a (sort of) diamond shape above the bust, then slash and spread the remaining part of the bodice to create pleats. Then sew back together.

I would work with a relaxed version of the bodice for this. The bodice I made with this method comes out very fitted. For this blouse I would just grade it to a bigger size so the blouse has some movement. And it’s easier to take in then release a garment anyway 😛

This is a very similar garment (image from here), with long sleeves, a shirt collar and made in black silk.

Various Vintage Necklines and How to Draft Them

Happy New Year! May 2013 bring you many new sewing ideas and lots of hours of sewing fun.

One of the books I started the year with was “Precision draping; a simple method for developing designing talent” by Nelle L. Weymouth. Published in 1889, this is a lovely book; everything is so well explained and it just makes pattern drafting seem so easy! I got to this book via The Perfect Nose, who posts lots of vintage goodies as well as marvelous sewing projects of her own.

One of the things that I sketched into my notebook for future reference were the necklines and how to design facings. My favourite were the sweetheart neckline, the triangular keyhole neckline and the peter pan collar, both the rounded and the pointed version.

The full lesson on neckline facings can be found here and these are the drawn notes I took while reading. Drawing helps me both remember notions I would like to experiment with and understand better what it is to be done. Just don’t get to bored by the repetitive busty lady shown below.

1. The Sweetheart Neckline
A rounded and rather modest sweetheart neckline is shown here, but you can make it as generous or as square as you like it.

The Sweetheart Neckline

2. The Keyhole Neckline.
A triangular shape is shown here but the same can be done with an oval shape.

The Keyhole Neckline

3. The Peter Pan Collar
The Peter Pan collar has been getting a lot of attention lately and I’ve seen many tutorials and even made my own following the pattern of a blouse I have. This all seems silly when you notice how simple it actually is to draft. If only I had pictured it like this 6 months ago.

The Peter Pan Collar

4. The Pointed Peter Pan Collar
Another reason why I am such a sucker for sewing books is learning the names of things. And then calling them by their names, dammit 🙂 This is such a pretty collar; did you know it was called a pointed peter pan? How do you call it?

The Pointed Peter Pan Collar

Hope this sounds at least 25% as exciting as it does to me and if not, well, I expect you to write about it in the comments section 🙂 I’d rather be told when I am boring than yap yap yap alone.